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Dynamics CRM - Entity Change Tracking

With the release of Dynamics CRM 2015 Online Update 1, Microsoft has provided developers many different ways to optimize performance when integrating with other systems.  We already covered Alternate Keys in a previous post which help increase performance by reducing the need to make retrieve API calls in order to find the primary key of a record.  In this post I will cover Entity Change Tracking, another feature of 2015 Online Update 1 which increases performance when needing to send data to an external system by retrieving only a subset of data that has changed since the last retrieval. 

So how does it work?

First you need to enable Change Tracking for the specific entity you want to use it on.  You can do this through the Entity customizations as shown below.

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Then the RetrieveEntityChanges request can be used in code to get a list of entity records that have changed since the last retrieval.  If it is the first request then you’ll want to pass in an empty string or null to the DataVersion property but subsequent requests should use a token (which is returned from RetrieveEntityChangesRespone) in order to retrieve a list of records that have been changed since the last request.

string token = "";

var records = new List<Entity>(); 
    
var request = new RetrieveEntityChangesRequest(); 
request.EntityName = "account"; 
request.Columns = new ColumnSet("name"); 
request.PageInfo = new PagingInfo() { Count = 5000, PageNumber = 1, ReturnTotalRecordCount = false }; 
request.DataVersion = token;    
    
while (true) 

     var response = (RetrieveEntityChangesResponse)orgService.Execute(request); 
    
     records.AddRange(response.EntityChanges.Changes.Select(x => (x as NewOrUpdatedItem).NewOrUpdatedEntity).ToArray()); 
     records.ForEach(x => Console.WriteLine(x.Id)); 
     if (!response.EntityChanges.MoreRecords) 
     { 
         token = response.EntityChanges.DataToken; 
         Console.WriteLine(token); 
         break;    
     } 
        
     request.PageInfo.PageNumber++; 
     request.PageInfo.PagingCookie = response.EntityChanges.PagingCookie; 
}   

Running this code using LinqPad in a brand new Online trial org with no token provided a list of 10 records that have been changed:

c15e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
c35e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
c55e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
c75e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
c95e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
cb5e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
cd5e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
cf5e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
d15e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c
d35e1260-e2cf-e511-80de-a45d36fd127c

And then the DataToken:

568840!02/10/2016 21:11:27

Running the same code above but passing in the token of “568840!02/10/2016 21:11:27” will now yield no results as expected as Account records haven’t been changed since we made our RetrieveEntityChanges request.

As you can see, this new request will be very handy when there is a need to synchronize data to external systems.  Now you can easily optimize performance by only synchronizing records that have been changed since the last sync.

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2015 Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Deploy Dynamics CRM with PowerShell Part 3: Auditing

Today's post is written by Ian Moore, a developer at Sonoma Partners.

Making sure that auditing is enabled and configured correctly is usually a critical step when setting up a new Dynamics CRM organization, especially a production instance. Everything related to auditing can easily be added to a deployment or setup script with a couple extra lines of PowerShell code.

The first step in configuring auditing for your organization is to make sure it is enabled at the system level. If it is not enabled here, no auditing will ever occur. Here is a simple code snippet to test if your CRM organization has auditing enabled, and to enable it if it does not:

From there, you will need to ensure that auditing is enabled at the entity level for all data where you want to track changes. If you’re not sure which entities have been configured to audit, you can actually use PowerShell to generate a simple report of your current entity audit settings:

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Once you know which entities still need to have auditing enabled, you can use metadata updates to configure each entity. The following snippet would enable auditing for accounts:

As with any metadata changes, you will need to make sure to publish changes for the entity. The easiest way from your PowerShell script would be to use the Publish-CrmAllCustomization function. If you are only updating a handful of entities, you could also create a PublishXmlRequest similar to the UpdateEntityRequest above rather than publishing all changes.

Hopefully these snippets help eliminate necessary manual steps when configuring auditing in your CRM environment.

Make sure to download the Microsoft.Xrm.Data.PowerShell module from GitHub at https://github.com/seanmcne/Microsoft.Xrm.Data.PowerShell and follow https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/crminthefield/ for updates to the module!

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Deploy Dynamics CRM with PowerShell Part 2: Importing SLAs

Today's post is written by Ian Moore, a Developer at Sonoma Partners.

If your Dynamics CRM deployment includes Service Level Agreements, you have probably encountered the following error in the import log when importing solutions from a dev environment to a testing environment:

“You can't edit an active SLA. Deactivate the SLA, and then try editing it.”

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This error occurs because your solution contains an SLA that is active in the current environment. Having an SLA in your solution can complicate imports if you forget to deactivate the SLA before starting, as the error will come at the end of the import process and you will have to start over. Thankfully we can use PowerShell to automatically deactivate any active SLAs and re-activate after importing an updated solution.

For this example we will use a simple solution that contains one SLA component, and try importing it into an organization that already has an active previous version of the SLA.

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After getting a connection with Get-CrmConnection, we can query for active SLA’s with Get-CrmRecords in the org we will be importing to:

$crmOrg = Get-CrmConnection –InteractiveMode

# get any active SLAs in the org
$SLAresults = Get-CrmRecords -conn $crmOrg -Entitylogicalname sla -Fields slaid, statecode, isdefault -FilterAttribute statecode -FilterOperator -eq -FilterValue Active

From here we can deactivate the SLAs with Set-CrmRecordState and import the solution:

# deactivate the active SLAs
$SLAresults['CrmRecords'] | % { Set-CrmRecordState -conn $crmOrg -CrmRecord $_ -StateCode Draft -StatusCode Draft }

# import solution
Import-CrmSolution -conn $crmOrg -SolutionFilePath C:\Path\To\Solutions\CaseEnhancements.zip -ActivatePlugins -PublishChanges

With the SLAs in draft status, the solution should import successfully. Once it is completed, we can re-activate the SLAs. One catch to this process is that any SLA that was not marked as Default will not be restored when it is reactivated – so after reactivation we can use Set-CrmRecord to update the “Is Default” property as necessary.

# re-activate SLAs
$SLAresults['CrmRecords'] | % { Set-CrmRecordState -conn $crmOrg -CrmRecord $_ -StateCode Active -StatusCode Active }

# update any default SLAs to be default again
$SLAresults['CrmRecords'] |
? { $_.isdefault -eq 'Yes' } |
% { Set-CrmRecord -conn $crmOrg -EntityLogicalName sla -Id $_.slaid -Fields @{'isdefault'=$true} }

Now any SLAs should be restored to their original state, and the solution with SLA updates is imported and applied. Here is a sample script that shows the whole process:

Make sure to download the Microsoft.Xrm.Data.PowerShell module from GitHub at https://github.com/seanmcne/Microsoft.Xrm.Data.PowerShell and follow https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/crminthefield/ for updates to the module!

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Dynamics CRM 2016 – Turn Any Text Field into an Auto-Complete

Before the holidays I wrote about the new keypress events that exist in Dynamics CRM 2016 and how they can be used to provide more rich data validation but also with the release of Dynamics CRM 2016, the keypress events can be utilized to provide even more functionality by way of auto-complete controls.  Auto-completion methods were added to the Xrm client-side library which can be used in conjunction with the keypress events to turn any text field into an auto-complete control.  This can come in handy if you want to pull data from a third-party source and display it as if it were a native lookup control in CRM. 

A great example of this would be turning the native State and Country address fields into an auto-complete using live data from another source.  Without further ado, lets jump into some code on how this can be accomplished using the native Country field.

In this example I will be using the geognos free web service to retrieve a list of countries as well as their respective flags.

Note:  The free web service is http only so if you are using it in an https-enabled CRM environment then you will have to manually allow access through a browser prompt.

First setup a standard onload event in your JavaScript and register it on your form.

Then make an ajax call to the geognos web service which will retrieve all countries and add them to a list along with a URL to an image of the country flag.

$.ajax({
     url: 'http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.jsonp',
     dataType: "jsonp",
     jsonpCallback: 'callback',
    success: function(data) {
          for (var country in data.Results) {
              countries.push({
                   id: country,
                   name: data.Results[country].Name,
                   icon: "http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/flag/" + country + ".png",
                   fields: [data.Results[country].Name] 
              });
          }
    }
});

Next we will write a function using the keypress event for the native address1_country field which will utilize the new auto-completion methods to hide and show a list of countries.  The kepress event needs to handle the logic to filter the list of countries based on what the user types so we will compare what the user typed to the name of the country in the list to filter it down and pass the results to the showAutoComplete method.  If the data passed into showAutoComplete has an icon property set (a url to an image) then it will display an icon next to the list item which we will utilize to display the country’s flag.

var keyPressFcn = function (ext) {
     try {
          var resultSet = { results: [] };
          var userInput = Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_country").getValue();
          var userInputLowerCase = userInput.toLowerCase();
          for (i = 0; i < countries.length; i++) {
               if (userInputLowerCase === countries[i].name.substring(0, 
                  userInputLowerCase.length).toLowerCase()) {
                     resultSet.results.push({
                          id: i,
                          fields: [countries[i].name],
                          icon: countries[i].icon
                     });
               }
               if (resultSet.results.length >= 10) break;
          }
          if (resultSet.results.length > 0) {
              ext.getEventSource().showAutoComplete(resultSet);
         }
         else {
             ext.getEventSource().hideAutoComplete();
         }
     } catch (e) {
          console.log(e);
     }
};

Lastly, we need to register the keypress function we wrote above to the address1_country keypress event

Xrm.Page.getControl("address1_country").addOnKeyPress(keyPressFcn);

Once we add the script to CRM and register the onload function we can now check it out in action!

Note:  The user can still type free-form text into the control and by default CRM won’t validate that the user selected something from the list but JavaScript validation could be added to make sure an item from the list was used if necessary for your business.

Here is the complete script for this example:

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Deploy Dynamics CRM with PowerShell Part 1: Duplicate Detection Rules

Today's post is written by Ian Moore, a Developer at Sonoma Partners.

The Dynamics CRM PFE team recently released Microsoft.Xrm.Data.PowerShell, which is a PowerShell module with cmdlets for interacting with data in a CRM Organization. It includes cmdlets that allow automation of solution exports and imports, changing system settings, and administration tasks. In this series of blogs, we will look at how these cmdlets can be used to automate common tasks that are encountered in deploying solutions for Dynamics CRM. The first part will be how to enable duplicate detection rules from PowerShell.

When importing a solution that contains an entity, it is not uncommon for CRM to unpublish any duplicate detection rules for the entity.

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This requires any affected rules to be published manually after the solution is imported. We can automate this process in a few lines of PowerShell.

First, create the following function:

This function takes in the CrmServiceClient created by the Get-CrmConnection cmdlet, and an array of guids for duplicate rules. Each guid is piped to the small “Create-PublishRuleRequest” function to create an SDK request, and the piped to the code block that executes the request and returns the response as a PublishDuplicateRuleResponse.

Now for the script, we need to make sure the module is imported and can create a connection to Dynamics CRM with Get-CrmConnection.

if (-Not (Get-Module -Name Microsoft.Xrm.Data.Powershell)) {
     Import-Module Microsoft.Xrm.Data.Powershell
}

$crmOrg = Get-CrmConnection –InteractiveMode

Before importing the solution, we can query for the duplicate rules that are currently published with Get-CrmRecords. By filtering for only active rules, we can make sure we don’t unintentionally publish a rule that wasn’t active prior to importing the solution.

$duplicaterules = Get-CrmRecords -conn $crmOrg 'duplicaterule' -FilterAttribute statecode -FilterOperator -eq -FilterValue Active

$duplicateruleIds = $duplicaterules['CrmRecords'] | select -ExpandProperty duplicateruleid

Now we have the guids we need for publishing, so we can import our solution to the organization with Import-CrmSolution, and call our publish function.

Import-CrmSolution -conn $crmOrg -SolutionFilePath C:\Path\To\Solutions\DevSolution_1_0_0.zip -PublishChanges

Publish-CrmDuplicateRules -conn $crmOrg -RuleIds $duplicateruleIds

Here is a sample script that shows the whole process.

Make sure to download the Microsoft.Xrm.Data.PowerShell module from GitHub at https://github.com/seanmcne/Microsoft.Xrm.Data.PowerShell and follow https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/crminthefield/ for updates to the module!

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Dynamics CRM 2016 – New Keypress Events

Just a few weeks ago Microsoft announced the official release of Dynamics CRM 2016 for both Online and on-premise.  With this release comes exciting new features for developers.  The new feature that I will cover in this post is the ability to add keypress events to number or text controls.  The new keypress event allows developers to trigger a function when the user presses keys in a number or text control.  This will allow developers to provide more rich data validation in a supported manner which is especially useful if auto-save is used in your organization. 

For example, if you want to ensure the user enters valid data into the native phone number field, we can register on the keypress event and automatically remove invalid characters as the user presses them.

First we will setup a function on the new addOnKeyPress event for the main telephone field.

Xrm.Page.getControl('telephone1').addOnKeyPress(function() { });

Then we will retrieve the value from the main telephone field to get the keys that the user inputted.

var userInput = Xrm.Page.getControl('telephone1').getValue();

Then we will build a regex to replace any of the inputted keys that are not “(“, “)”, “-“, or a number.

userInput = userInput.replace(/[^\d-()]+/g, '');

Lastly, we will replace the main telephone value with the new clean version of the user’s input

Xrm.Page.getAttribute('telephone1').setValue(userInput);

It’s just that easy!  Now if a user presses an invalid character in the main telephone field, it will automatically delete the character so the field will not be saved with invalid data.

Below is the full snippet of code:

Head here for the full SDK documentation on the new keypress methods.

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Introducing Dynabacus – Microsoft CRM Record Count Tool

Today’s guest blogger is Mike Dearing, a Principal Developer at Sonoma Partners.

Ever wanted to get an accurate record count of all of your organization’s companies, contacts, <enter additional entity names here…>?  Well, you aren’t alone.  Your current options to accomplish this are limited. They include doing excel exports, writing reports, or performing SQL count queries (if your deployment is on-premise). We decided to develop a user-friendly, managed solution that you can easily drop into any Dynamics 2015 on-premise or online environment to perform these counts for you.  Dynabacus (the Dynamics-abacus) gives CRM administrators the ability to get the record count of any number of entities (native or custom) simultaneously.  Administrators can also refine these counts further by applying personal and system views if they choose to do so.  Then with the simple click of a button, Dynabacus crunches the numbers for you using supported API calls and returns the results.

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And the best part is, it’s available now for free! Download it today and let us know what you think!

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2015 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Announcing CRM DevTools for CRM 2015 and Update 1!

Last January we released a brand new tool called CRM DevTools for CRM 2013 and 2011 UR12+.  Today we’re happy to announce a new update that supports CRM 2015 and CRM 2015 Update 1.  If you missed the original release, head here for usage information or here for the latest release.

Along with CRM 2015 and Update 1 support, we added a few more handy features.

Note:  Most of these new features will open a new window so be sure enable pop-ups

Form Tab – Record Properties

The Record Properties button on the Form tab brings back the old Properties page from CRM 2011 that still exists but isn’t surfaced anywhere in the UI.  The page displays the permissions on the record and the Created By, Created On, Last Modified By, and Last Modified On.

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Form Tab – Performance Center

The Performance Center button on the Form tab displays the native Performance Center on top of the record form.  The Performance Center is used to debug any performance issues with a record form to see where it can be optimized.

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Debug Tab

The new Debug tab replaces the old DB & Server tab.  The information from the old tab is now within the Environment Info button.  The Debug tab has 5 buttons to provide easy access to native debug pages within your CRM environment.

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Debug Tab – Diagnostics Page

The Diagnostics Page button opens the native Diagnostics page for your environment.  This page helps debug any network issues and admins can use it to run a latency and bandwidth test.

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Debug Tab – Environment Info

The Environment Info button opens the native Debug Information page for the CRM environment.  It contains version information for the CRM server and database, along with other settings. 

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Debug Tab – Default Solution

The Default Solution button is pretty straight-forward and will open up the default solution for the organization.
 

Debug Tab – CRM For Tablets

The CRM For Tablets button will open up the CRM For Tablets app within your browser.  This is very handy to help debug any JavaScript issues with the app.  The native browser developer tools can be used to see any JavaScript errors that might occur within the app.  It can also be used to just see how the app will look with your organization.

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We hope you enjoy the latest release of CRM DevTools as much as we do!  Hit us up in the comments with any feedback or suggestions for future releases.

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2015 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

Refreshed Dynamics CRM Phone App Available

A few months back, Microsoft announced the new and improved version of their Phone Client would be available with the Spring 2015 release.  However, with releasing any app to the various app stores, they’re not released immediately.

However, recently the app did show up in the Apple app store and we were able to get our hands on it to take a look and compare it to the previous version.  The previous version is still available in the app store, and has been rebranded “Dynamics CRM for phones express.”  A couple years ago we blogged about it’s release and the functionality it provided back then.  I linked to that post so you could compare and contrast the look and feel of the previous express version, to the new and improved version.

The new version, branded “Dynamics CRM for phones”, is now available in the Apple store, Windows store, and Android store.  You can tell the difference in the apps based on the icon and name.

imageimage

Microsoft is moving to a “configure once, deploy everywhere model.”  What does that mean?  That means the life of a configurator is going to be that much better.  More specifically, the form customizations you make in the CRM web client, will now not only be what you see on the CRM Tablet client (as they have been since it’s release), but will also be what you see on the new CRM Phone client.  Therefore instead of having to update the main forms AND the mobile express forms, you’ll just need to update the main form for any changes you make to be applied across the board.

Now to the details.  What does the new Phone Client look like?  Well if you’ve used the Tablet Client before, it’ll look very similar to that.

When you initially log in (requiring only your IFD URL to your organization, user id and password), you’ll see your home page.  This home page is the Sales Dashboard.  However, in the Web Client, you can create additional dashboards that can be selected when you’re on the home page on the Phone Client, and you can also make that dashboard your default dashboard.

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As you can see, from here you’re able to view records that you’ve pinned to your home page.  You can also resize tiles that are on your home page and this makes it super convenient for records with contact information like the Patrick Sands sample contact record above.  You can easily email and call this contact now directly from your home page without having to click into his record.

You can also see at the top of the page the global menu bar which has the following commands from left to right:

  • Back – takes you to previous pages
  • Home – takes you to your home page
  • Search – initiates a multi-entity search
  • Site Map – displays the entities you can navigate to

Also on all pages at the bottom right is an ellipses.  Clicking on this presents more options for the area you’re working in, as well as allows you to create a new record from anywhere you’re at within the application.

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When you navigate to an entity from the site map, you can create a new record of that entity type by clicking the plus button at the top of the page.

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When on a record, you can view the data about the record and related data very easily.  The Phone Client now uses the same exact forms that the Tablet Client and Web Client use (configure once, deploy everywhere).  If you’re going in to talk to a customer, you can navigate to their account and view any open cases or opportunities immediately from the Phone Client.  You can click into an Opportunity to then see the process based form, and where you’re at within the sales process.

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The phone app also allows you to easily create emails and make phone calls by clicking on email address and phone number fields.  The email fields will automatically open your native email client, and the phone fields will automatically initiate your phone client.  The good thing is after you hang up the call, you’re returned to CRM with a new phone form initiated so you can just punch in the details and click save.

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The integration between the Phone Client and the native mobile phone doesn’t end there.  Any address field on the application is clickable, and when doing so, you’ll open up the native map application.

The Phone Client also has a disconnected mode just like the Tablet Client.  While the offline mode is better that previous versions, this is still lacking in that it’s not showing you all records that you have access to, but instead, recently accessed records.  You can create new records while offline (called offline drafts), but unfortunately you cannot modify records while offline unless it was one that you just created while offline.  You can view your offline draft records by navigating to them via the Site Map (you’ll see a new “Draft Records” entry with a count of drafts).  Then when you’re back online, you can go into this list of drafts, and re-save them for them to save to the CRM database.  Not ideal, but is much better than nothing, and I’m really looking forward to what Microsoft has in store for vNext.

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It’s great to see Microsoft continue this “mobile first’ mode and add more products to it’s repertoire.  Enhancing the Mobile Express app and making a true mobile phone app now rounds out their suite of products (web, tablet, phone) to all be first class.  Next steps are to add more features to these apps so that functionality that’s available on the web, is also available on these apps (e.g., custom web resources).  I’m also looking forward to seeing how they further improve on their offline story, and hopeful they provide a true offline solution where users can work with existing records while offline, and not only new records they create while offline.

However, as you can see, the application is pretty robust as it stands.  And the best part is the cost:  FREE!  Go ahead and download your copy now and start playing around.

Topics: Enterprise Mobility Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2015 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online

You Too Can Snoop… But Not In A Creepy Way

Today’s guest blogger is Stephen Habegger, a Senior Developer at Sonoma Partners.

Awhile back, we showcased an application called CRM Snoop on our website. Snoop is a tool that allows developers to listen to Dynamics CRM plugin messages and peer into the darkest depths of an IPluginExecutionContext object. It’s a tool that can be extremely useful for plugin debugging and development and was only available for use internally at Sonoma Partners… until now.

We’ve recently revamped the application completely, moving away from its former incarnation as a WPF application and creating a new managed solution that can be installed in both on-premise and online Dynamics CRM 2015 environments. And now we’re making the solution publicly available here.

What’s In the Solution?

The Snoop solution will create two new entities in your Dynamics CRM organization, Snoop Session and Snoop Session Results. A Snoop Session represents a configuration for snooping on plugin messages (i.e. what entities and what messages you want to listen to). When you start recording a set of messages, a plugin is registered on those messages, and they are saved as Snoop Session Results records.

How Do I Use It?

After installing the CRMSnoop managed solution, navigate to Settings > Solutions. Click the new Snoop Sessions button in the command bar.

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A new window will launch with a list of Snoop Session records. Open one or create a new one. When the form has loaded, select the entities and messages you wish to record. Optionally, select Include Available Images to register Pre and Post Entity Images where applicable. You can also select Only Record My Actions to ensure actions performed by other users don’t show up in your results. Then, just click Start Recording.

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After you begin recording, the Results section of the Snoop Session form will display an animated timeline of messages as they happen. You can click on the message icons in the timeline or in the table below to display the detailed properties of the IPluginExecutionContext passed to the plugin message. When you are finished recording, click the Pause Recording button.

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You can also navigate to the list of related Snoop Session Results in the header of the Snoop Session form. The form for an individual Snoop Session Results record also displays the results for that particular message.

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It is important to note that the recording process relies on the Snoop Session record status. That means recording does not end automatically when the Snoop Session form is closed. The recording must be stopped by clicking the Pause Recording button. The recording may be resumed at any time with the same or altered configuration. In some scenarios it may make sense to let a recording continue over a period of time. However, we do not recommend this in a production environment as there may be a performance impact.

What Is It Good For?

Snoop is an excellent tool for developing and debugging plugins in a variety of scenarios. It allows the developer to see the input a plugin may receive without profiling or attaching a debugger. Use it to check out what fields are changing during an Update operation. Keep a link handy to a specific Snoop Session Results record for when you don’t remember what’s in that pesky Opportunity Won message. Record in a User Acceptance Testing environment to collect a log and figure out what those crazy users are doing to break your plugin.

Will you find another use for Snoop? Let us know what your favorite features are and how you use it.

Enjoy!

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2015 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online