Sonoma Partners Microsoft CRM and Salesforce Blog

It’s Official! We’re a Microsoft ISV Development Center

Today's blog post was written by Ariel Upton, Marketing Manager at Sonoma Partners.

This week our team is at the Microsoft Inspire Conference in Washington D.C., meeting with Microsoft leaders and learning more about what’s to come for Dynamics 365. One piece of exciting news coming out of the Capitol – we’ve been identified as one of the inaugural Microsoft ISV Development Centers due to our CRM specialization.

As a member of this prestigious program, we have access to Microsoft ISV and product teams to work through specific architectural considerations and complex client requirements. If you’re a new or existing Microsoft ISV, this means we have an even stronger set of resources to help you build your solution for Dynamics 365, or re-platform an existing solution onto the Microsoft Cloud.

“Microsoft selected Sonoma Partners as one of our launch ISV Development Center partners based on their strong technical expertise, and their ability to help ISVs get their solutions through the AppSource listing process. Any ISV building a Dynamics 365 integration around sales, marketing and service should definitely consider engaging a company like Sonoma Partners to get their solution to market as quickly as possible,” Pat Fitzhenry, Director, Microsoft ISV Development Centers.

We’re thrilled to receive this designation and are here to provide advisory services to help ISVs get their teams up to speed on how to build, support, and maintain a D365-based solution. Thank you to our partners at Microsoft for selecting us as an inaugural Microsoft ISV Development Center!

Topics: ISV for CRM Microsoft Dynamics 365

ISV Customer Success Story: Glance Integrates Cobrowse Solution with Dynamics 365

Today's blog post was written by Kayla Silverstein, Marketing Specialist at Sonoma Partners.

According to a recent Forrester report: “Companies increasingly leverage visual engagement – video, cobrowsing, screen sharing, and annotations – to cut through the customer conversation clutter to be better understood, and to connect emotionally.”

Glance Networks is a key player in the visual engagement space, offering a platform that helps cut through “conversation clutter.” By leveraging Glance’s interactive visual offerings, users can provide better service experiences and online interactions with their clients.

We worked closely with Glance Networks to integrate their cobrowsing solution with Dynamics 365. We sat down with the Glance team to learn a more about their interest in building their solution for the Dynamics 365 platform, what it was like working with Sonoma Partners, and the growing importance of enterprise CRM in their industry.

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Why did you decide to integrate your solution with Dynamics 365?

Glance: We’ve worked with other CRM partners for years. We get a lot of opportunities from these partners, and our customers are happy with the tightly-integrated functionality. In discussions with many enterprise accounts, we’ve seen an increase in those who already have Dynamics, or are considering moving to Dynamics. Given the quality of these prospective users, it made sense to explore how we could integrate our cobrowse solution with Dynamics. We’ve had great success with other providers, and Microsoft was eager and excited to work with us.

Why did you choose Sonoma Partners?

Glance: We asked ourselves whether we should choose a partner who knows Glance really well but doesn’t know Dynamics, or do we go with a new partner who isn’t as familiar with Glance but is an expert in Microsoft’s CRM space. Ultimately, we decided that this partner would need to become an expert in the Glance platform anyway, so partnering with a firm that has Dynamics expertise was the key factor in our decision.

“We wanted to work with someone who had a great reputation in the Dynamics space, and choosing Sonoma Partners was the best decision we could have made. They were able to deliver on their promises with a great product, and we couldn’t be happier with the end result.”

Apart from the integration with the Dynamics service itself, we wanted to work with a partner who understands the process of listing in Microsoft AppSource, and the intricacies that follow. This was fundamental to our success with our other CRM providers, so we knew how important that would be in raising our profile among the customer base. Sonoma Partners offered the expertise we needed to get the job done and cross the finish line.

 

Are you looking for a partner who could help you get into AppExchange or AppSource and invest your solution in a market-leading CRM platform? We’d be happy to help.

Topics: ISV for CRM Microsoft Dynamics 365

Lightning Locker Service and You: Working with SecureDOM

Today's blog post was written by Nathen Drees, Senior Data Integration Developer at Sonoma Partners.

One of Salesforce’s recent major releases is the force enablement of the Lightning LockerService. While Salesforce has done their best to give plenty of warning about the LockerService being force enabled, we still see some of our partners and developers confused about what exactly it is, and if it affects them.

Today we wanted to review what the LockerService is, provide context for when it will affect you, and some recommendations on working within it.

What is the Lightning LockerService?

When Salesforce released the Lightning Experience, it had a vision for the AppExchange: developers could write lots of tiny components, and administrators could install them in their org, promoting code reuse and reducing the need to hire for custom development. It was a win-win proposition for both parties – developers have more chances to sell their individual widgets, while administrators have more options to choose from. But this vision comes with a problem: for this exchange to work, Salesforce needs to guarantee that the various components installed by administrators stay safe from one another, to prevent (accidental or otherwise) runaway scripts from causing too much damage. Unfortunately, browsers don’t natively provide a way for multiple scripts within a page to be sandboxed from one another – everyone has access to (more-or-less) everything on the page.

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Enter Lightning LockerService

This is where the Lightning LockerService comes in to play. It provides each lightning component a “locker” that is must fit within, stricter guidelines on what it’s allowed to do, and how it can communicate with other components.

Here’s a comprehensive introduction to the technical aspects of the LockerService on the Salesforce blog, but the key idea to understand is that components are not able to access anything on the page at any time. If components wish to communicate, they  need to coordinate in some agreed upon manner (such as application events).

Does the Lightning LockerService Affect Me?

If you write Lightning Components, the Lightning LockerService affects you.

Going forward (API version 40+), you will need to ensure that your components adhere to the LockerService’s rules or you may find that they no longer function as expected. However, adhering to the LockerService’s rules isn’t as difficult as it may seem.

Working Within the Lightning LockerService

If you are sticking to the native APIs provided by Lightning Components, enabling the LockerService doesn’t change much for you during development. The main area it impacts is when you try to navigate out of your current component into another – this may no longer work as expected, specifically if those other components are not in the same namespace as yours.

In an attempt to help developers ensure that they’re staying within the guidelines (and also pass a security review), Salesforce released the Salesforce Lightning CLI, which lints the components for known errors and mistakes. Using this tool liberally will help to avoid the common cross-component scripting mistakes that may break your components going forward.

If you do need to work across components, you need to start designing and writing events to let the components communicate amongst themselves. Depending on the structure of the components, you’ll want to consider either an application event or a component event.

Wrapping Up

There are of course many more tricks for making sure your components continue to work with the LockerService, most of them being not very difficult to implement. If you would like help reviewing and/or correcting your components, or are looking to launch your product on the platform but could use the help of experienced developers, contact us and we can help.

Topics: ISV for CRM Salesforce