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The 10 Dashboards Every Project Manager Should Use

Today's blog post was written by Brian Kasic, Principal Consultant at Sonoma Partners.

In many types of business environments, using dashboards is a common theme for daily management. But have you ever used it to manage your team or group? I like thinking, “You can’t manage what you don’t measure!” As I became a program manager and supervisor of a large team, I really started taking this concept to heart and have used it ever since. However, it’s harder than it seems to pull off managing via dashboards successfully. Today’s blog is about the key elements I use on a daily basis to manage a multi-million-dollar project with a 75-person project team disbursed in multiple time zones across the world.

The ideal scenario is looking at dashboards targeted for each individual.

They show the most important items to accomplish for that day, tell you what to expect in the future, easily demonstrates progress for what’s been accomplished, and can also be run to create an instant status report. 

CRM systems are ideal to enable you to manage in this fashion. They are easily adjustable, intuitive, and simple to export data for deeper xls analysis. You can also create the underlying dashboard data and enable your dashboard to be drilled into for cases when you want to see a specific team or individuals progress. They can be secured to target various groups of executive management or be available to the entire team.

Here are my top 10 dashboards organized from the viewpoint of a program manager. They can be used for different members of team, such as the individuals in the nitty gritty details all the way to executive management have varying interest in each one of the themes. Each person plays a part in supporting the details that make them usable. The dashboards only work well if you have a process to consistently and accurately supply them with data and give feedback on what they are telling you. If not, you are out of luck. So before you start dashing around spinning up dashboards, please make sure your underlying data is consistent and clean. Also ask yourself, “Once I have this dashboard, how am I going to use it?” You should be able to take action on every dashboard you use. If not, question its value.

In the list below are key dashboard themes and the underlying ways they are used.

DASHBOARD TYPE #1: Resources

USE: Shows future staffing needs and if the team size should be increased or reduced.

ACTION: Moves resources from various areas of the project to maximize utilization.

DASHBOARD TYPE #2: Workload / Capacity

USE: Measures time estimates vs. time available.

ACTION: Adds more capacity to teams that need the assistance.

DASHBOARD TYPE #3:  Detailed Progress

USE: Shows past due tasks and ownership.

ACTION: Assists team members who have questions and identify problem areas within the project.

DASHBOARD TYPE #4: Project Blockers

USE: Assists in running the daily stand-up meeting to highlight items hindering progress.

ACTION: Identifies next steps to clear the impediments.

DASHBOARD TYPE #5: Communication / Status Reporting

USE: Generates a weekly status report with items accomplished for the past week and planned for the future week.

ACTION: Engages the team if areas are behind schedule or milestones were accomplished.

DASHBOARD TYPE #6: Escalations

USE: Highlights problem areas for upper management.

ACTION: Shifts priorities to address the items requiring management attention.

DASHBOARD TYPE #7: Daily Meetings

USE: Runs daily meetings with real-time data.

ACTION: Makes edits on the spot. Eliminates the need to take detailed meeting notes if all the data exists in the dashboards and is real-time within the system.

DASHBOARD TYPE #8: Variance Analysis

USE: Explains why variations happened.

ACTION: Takes action on variances that seem unusual.

DASHBOARD TYPE #9: Risk / Mitigation

USE: Shows risks.

ACTION: Documents plan to mitigate or reduce the risk area.

DASHBOARD TYPE #10: Roadmap / Project Plan

USE: Visualizes for the project team what is upcoming and gets visibility to the schedule.

ACTION: Updates the plan if circumstances change.

Hopefully in seeing my top 10 dashboards you can more effectively manage your projects and teams. If you ever have questions on this or other CRM management challenges, drop us a line!

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Topics: CRM Best Practices