Sonoma Partners Microsoft CRM and Salesforce Blog

A Step by Step Guide to Create Your First Survey with Dynamics CRM 2016 Voice of the Customer

Dynamics CRM 2016 was recently released and with it a whole slew of new features and functionality.  A bunch of features were planned for the initial 2016 release, but for one reason or another were delayed.  This website is a very simple way of understanding what’s been released for primetime, versus what’s in preview, what’s in development, and what’s been indefinitely postponed.

One such feature that wasn’t immediately available at the release of 2016 was Voice of the Customer.  This is the ability to create, send, and monitor surveys from Dynamics CRM.  This feature is currently only available for CRM Online, and below I’ll go into more detail on how to get it enabled, and how to create your first survey.

Struggling with user adoption? Deploy Control Tower to your Microsoft Dynamics CRM system to get the data you need to measure and drastically improve end user adoption.

Note that this feature is delivered through an integration with Azure Web Services. This means data will be flowing and queued through Azure in order to take any workload of delivering and capturing customer survey data off of your CRM system for the best possible performance.  This also means that there could be a delay between survey response from making it into CRM.

Below we’re going to go into an overview of enabling Voice of the Customer, and setting up and sending your first survey.  This post won’t go into everything that’s available with Voice of the Customer as there’s a lot to it, but will cover the basics. 

 

Enabling

To enable Voice of the Customer, simply log into the CRM Online Administration Center, and select the org you want to install VOTC to, and click on Solutions.  Then you’ll be taken to the page with the preferred solutions that you can install, and simply click on the “Install” icon to start the installation. 

image

image

Once the installation is complete in CRM navigate to Solutions and open up the Voice of the Customer solution.  Then check off “I agree to the terms and conditions” and click on “Enable Voice of the Customer”.  You’re now set to start configuring your first survey!

image

 

Survey Creation

The Voice of the Customer functionality allows you to add theming to your surveys.  To do so you just navigate to the Images and Themes area of the VOTC module. 

image

And from there you can go ahead and create an Image record and upload a logo that you want to use in your survey will be accomplished in later steps.  After you upload the logo and save the record you’ll be able to see a preview of the image.

image

You can also go to the Themes area and create a new Theme to use for your logo.  You have the ability to change the colors of most of the survey elements such as the header, navigation bar, and progress background.  I strongly recommend you make use of a UX engineer to help you pick your colors wisely so that they don’t clash too much.  If you wanted to get more advanced, you can even upload your own CSS to apply even more custom styles to your survey.

image

Now that you have your image and theme setup, you’re ready to create your survey.  Navigate to Voice of the Customer –> Surveys, and click New to create your new survey.  You’ll see on the survey form that there are a lot of options to configure your survey.  We’re not going to cover them all in this post but you’ll notice that the we’re able to apply the Image and Theme we created previously.

image

In order to actually start building out the survey questions, you need to change from the Survey to the Designer form.  You’ll notice that here there’s also the Dashboard form where you can see statistics about survey responses.  For now we’ll click on Designer and start creating some questions.

image

On the Designer form, you have the ability to add or delete pages in your survey via the buttons that appear underneath the vertical page layout on the left.  You can’t delete the Welcome or Complete page – those are required for all surveys.

image

When in the design mode, you’ll be able to drag question types from the right over onto the main pane in the middle.  When you hover over a question on the page, you’ll be able to delete the question, make quick edits inline on the page to the question label, or click the pencil icon to take you to a more advanced editor so you can change more settings for the question other than the label.

image

image

In the text box of the question (and of any label control on the survey), you can click on the (Pipe) dropdown to insert piped data into your survey.  We’ll see how this works with workflows later when we create a workflow to automatically send out the survey upon case resolution.  In this example, we’ll insert the case number into the survey question, and we’ll use the Other1 pipe to store this data (again, that’s setup when you create the workflow and we’ll discuss that in a later step).

image

image

Here’s what our welcome page looked like with all the pipes in it.  We want to make a very personalized experience for the customer as they take the survey.  I also threw the other pipes in there so you can see how we’re able to get as much data out of CRM as possible to personalize our survey for our customer.

image

Something else you can do to add logic to your survey is to create Response Routings.  An example of when you’d use a response routing is if you want a customer to fill out an additional question, if they answered a certain way on a previous question.  For example, you may ask the customer how they’d rate the experience with your company, and if they provide a low rating, you may want to display an additional question to gather more information on why they felt that way.  To get to response routings, click on the related records dropdown of your survey.

image

When you setup your response routing rules, you need to create Conditions and Actions for each Response Routing.  See below how we’re only showing the “Can you please provide us with additional information” question if the user responded 1 to the star rating question.  Otherwise we don’t show it.

image

After completing the above, your survey is ready to be published.  If you toggle back to the Survey form, you can click on the Preview button to see what the survey would look like to your end users.  When you’re all set, you can click on Publish so that the survey is now accessible externally.

Survey Automation and Results

Now that you have your survey setup, you can use it along with native CRM workflow to have surveys automatically sent out to your customers based on actions to CRM data.  For example, lets create a workflow that sends our survey automatically to the customer of a Case when the case is marked Resolved, asking them how their experience working with your support team was, so you can make improvements if needed, or provide recognition where deserved.

First off, create a new Workflow and make sure to have it run on update of the Case Status field.  Check to make sure the status has been updated to Resolved, and then add in a step to create a new email.  Your workflow should look similar to that below.

image

Now when editing the email step of the workflow, you’ll want to copy the value in the “Email Snippet” field of the Survey, and paste this into the body of the email step in your workflow.  Your email step may look something similar to the following.

image 

image

Notice in this email above that I’m making the use of the piped tokens (that I had placed in my survey earlier) with dynamic data from the Case record the workflow is running on.  It doesn’t matter what field from the record I’m on that I use within each pipe.  You’ll see that in the actual survey the user is taken to, that the pipes are resolved to the actual data on the Case that was recently resolved. 

Note that in the above workflow email step, I had to manually type in the pipes in between the Email Snippet that we copied from the survey and into the workflow email step.

Make sure to Activate the workflow, and then you can go and test it out.  Once a Case is resolved in CRM, the email that’s send to the customer looks similar to the following.

image

And if the user clicks on the hyperlink to launch their survey, they’ll be taken to the actual survey.  As stated above, the pipes used in the survey are resolved to the actual data from the case.  You can also see that if I answer greater than 1 on the 5 star rating of my overall experience, that I won’t see the question asking me why I rated the overall experience a 1 based on the routing rules we setup earlier.

image

image

Also note that the survey has a responsive design so that if you’re accessing it from a mobile device such as a phone, the survey resizes to fit the screen appropriately.

image   image

Upon completion of the survey, and after the data from Azure syncs back to Dynamics CRM, you’ll be able to change to the Dashboard form on your survey record to see the results trickling back in from your survey. 

image

You can also navigate to Survey Responses off of the Survey to see the individual responses.  If you open up a response you’ll be able to see the individual questions and answers that were asked and part of that specific response.

Note:  The responses (including the question and answer) are stored in a first class Question Responses entity.  This means that if you wanted to take this one step further, you could create a workflow on the Question Responses entity, and if a Question Response record is created where a response is poor (e.g., where the customer rated the overall experience a 1 star), an email can be sent to the appropriate team to follow up on why that customer answered that question the way they did.

image

image

 

Gotchas

As I was working through and testing out my first survey, I ran into a few gotchas that I figured would be great to note down as I suspect others may run into these similar issues.

First off, when using Response Routings, if you want to only show a question when another question has a certain value (for example in my case where I wanted to show a text box if someone rated the service a 1), you probably don’t want the text box to appear when the customer hasn’t answered the rating question.  In other words, you don’t want the text box to appear when they initially load the page of questions.  You ONLY want it to appear when they rate your service a 1.  In order for this to happen, you have to make sure that on that specific question that you set the Visibility field to “Do not display” which is the default visibility of the question.

Next, I ran into an issue with the pipes in my survey not actually being populated with dynamic data from CRM.  It had turned out that when I was testing this out with my workflow, I had copied the Email Snippet of the survey to my workflow email body more than once.  This causes the Email Snippet and Piped data to break and after I removed the duplicate Email Snippet from my workflow email, the pipes began to work as expected.

Also note that if you want the updates you made to your survey to be live, you’ll need to publish your survey after making changes.  Simply saving it using the native CRM buttons will not publish it to Azure, but instead just save the updates in CRM.

Finally, if your survey responses aren’t being returned to CRM, navigate to the Voice of the Customer solution and make sure to click on the link to Trigger Response Processing.  Note that this could take up to 15 minutes to complete and for responses to appear in CRM.

image

For more information on Voice of the Customer, head over to Microsoft’s website.

Topics: Microsoft Dynamics CRM Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online